About Save-A-Pet

Save-A-Pet Adoption Center, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, is one of the largest no-kill rescues in Lake County, and one of the very few operating a full-time adoption center, as well. Save-A-Pet provides a safe haven and high quality care for our rescued animals at all costs. Thus, Save-A-Pet gives our rescued dogs and cats the greatest opportunity at a second chance. Save-A-Pet takes great pride in practicing our no-kill mission and in stewarding our donors’ contributions: both of which have led to the successful adoption of over 40,000 dogs and cats!

As a no-kill rescue, Save-A-Pet does not temperament test our dogs and cats, nor do we discriminate against age, health, or any breeds. Save-A-Pet is also a resource to the various communities we serve. Save-A-Pet offers two year-round youth volunteer programs, two safety seminars/classes per year, low-cost microchipping, guest speakers for schools & retirement homes, and more.

On a daily basis, Save-A-Pet faces two basic challenges: rescue and education. The rescue cycle includes the process and costs of intake, vaccinations, surgeries (i.e., spay/neuter), prescription food, preventative medications, chronic illness medications (i.e., for FIV, heart murmurs, allergies, IBD, arthritis, etc.), and the emotional healing of the residents. The educational cycle includes the process and costs of rehabilitating the residents before and after adoption, as well as the costs for training adopters in preventative care and solving behavioral problems.

Successful outcomes of our efforts include reduced cruelty to animals and increased adoption rates. Every successful adoption represents an opportunity to save an additional life. Successful outcomes of educational cycles include the total wellness and healing of our residents, and the lifelong happiness of adopters who can share love and compassion with their pets by providing them with forever home.

Save-A-Pet constantly works toward a realization of our no-kill mission where no animal is turned away or euthanized (by others) due to lack of space or funding such that we can treat them, heal them and prepare them for adoption. To accomplish this, we also have to educate the community about animal welfare, animal health care, and encourage owners to have their cats and dogs spayed or neutered to lessen the number of homeless pets.